PICTURE the scene.

Early in 2017 a Jaguar executive walks into meeting and asks engineers: “See that brand new E-Pace you’ve been working on for years, we need to barrel roll it.”

Cue much laughter.

But it really happened. It will undoubtedly the most talked-about and spectacular car launches in history.

Now Jaguar have released a short documentary which details how they managed to get the brand-new E-Pace to perform a barrel roll at its world debut.

Jaguar’s E-Pace launch was a highly anticipated event given the recent success of the F-Pace which was crowned World Car of the Year 2017.

Graham Wilkins, Chief Engineer of the Jaguar E-Pace, said: “It’s in an engineer’s nature to want to continually improve. We asked ourselves ‘how do we better the F-Pace loop’, which was spectacular.

“The next natural evolution for Jaguar was to push the car to leave the ground.”

Jaguar E-Pace epic launch

Jaguar E-Pace epic launch

The brand-new mid-size SUV has received generally positive response from the public and critics so far but it was the barrel roll that stole the headlines.

The British car manufacturer wanted to push the boundaries in what was possible to do with the car and take their risk-taking to another level.

At the Jaguar F-Pace launch in 2016 the car performed a loop-de-loop but, at the E-Pace unveiling, the car aimed to go airborne.

The SUV setting the new Guinness World Record for the furthest barrel roll in a production vehicle.

It’s a nail-biting moment in the video where the car left the ramp before it comfortably lands on the other side.

While the spectacle was over in a just 1.5 seconds, the stunt itself took six months of planning and tests to make it happen.

Over that period of time the E-Pace withstood an impressive 33 test jumps.

Up until the practice jump, driverless technology and robots were in control of the car as the team worked out how to achieve the James Bond-esque stunt.

Matt Eyes, Vehicle and Engineering Manager on the Jaguar E-Pace said: ”With our suspension design getting a car to go into a barrel is near on impossible.

“So we had to understand with analysis how to get that right.

In the film you can see various failed attempts as the car was fired from the ramp into a giant airbag.

Data from each of the test jumps was analysed and minute adjustments were made to ensure that the car completed the jump.

Stunt man Terry Grant said: “This is groundbreaking stuff, we want to get perfection that is what we’re aiming for.”