If you’ve got around £2 million burning a hole in your pocket and fancy spending it on a Bugatti Chiron, you better hurry up as only around 100 are still available.

When the Chiron was launched in 2016, Bugatti announced that just 500 would be built. According to Car and Driver, around 180 Chirons have been delivered to buyers around the world so far, and the waiting list currently runs to 2022. Bugatti communications director, Tim Bravo, told the magazine that less than 100 are still available to order.

So, Bugatti has sold at least 400 Chirons in just three years. To put that into perspective, it took ten years to sell 450 examples of the Veyron. Towards the end, Bugatti allowed buyers to specify often outlandish customisations in an effort to shift the last remaining cars, as the Chiron wouldn’t be launched until the Veyron’s production run had been completed.

In 2018, Bugatti launched the Chiron Sport, which is no more powerful but weighs fractionally less and has suspension set up for a more focused driving experience. Bravo confirmed to C&D that the Sport now accounts for the bulk of production. At the recent New York Auto Show, a special edition version of the Sport celebrating the French marque’s 110th anniversary was unveiled – 20 will be built.

The wild, one-off La Voiture Noire, featuring a custom body, was unveiled at this year’s Geneva Motor Show, as well, and no doubt there will be other heavily customised Chirons emerging from the factory as the production run progresses.

Just in case you need reminding, here’s a run-down of the Chiron’s vital statistics: it’s powered by a mid-mounted 8.0-litre, quad-turbo W16 engine that produces 1,479hp and 1,180lb/ft of torque, sent to all four wheels via a seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox.

Performance is, inevitably, crushing. 0-62mph take 2.4secs; 0-124mph takes 6.5secs; 0-186mph takes 13.6secs and top speed is limited to 261mph. Though it can probably top out at around 280mph.

More mind-bending than that, though, is that the Chiron set a world record by accelerating from rest to 249mph in 32.6secs and then stopping in just 9.4secs. From 249mph!

Two million quid for performance like that almost seems like a bargain.

By Graham King