This confection is the Range Rover Sport SVR-based Overfinch SuperSport. Which somehow manages to be even less subtle than the SVR, a car that is already about as subtle as Donald Trump.

Overfinch has added its own bumpers, grille, side skirts, bonnet, rear spoiler and many, many vents. Much of that lot is bare carbonfibre, available in the usual satin or gloss finish. Or, if you prefer, you can have a “crushed” effect or a herringbone weave. It rides on 22in wheels.

Under the bonnet, Overfinch has added a cold-air induction kit, while gases exit via a lightweight titanium exhaust which delivers “impressive volume.” Because what the standard SVR is most lacking in is volume.

Sorry, that’s what the standard SVR is least lacking in!

Overfinch claims these mods improve performance, but doesn’t provide any figures to back that claim up. We reckon the carbonfibre engine cover alone knocks at least a tenth of a second off the 0-60mph time.

The standard SVR produces 567hp and 516lb/ft of torque from its 5.0-litre, supercharged V8 motor, enough for a 0-62mph time of 4.5secs and a top speed of 176mph. Pretty profound performance in a car that weighs 2.5 tons.

Overfinch retrims the interior of the SuperSport to the buyer’s (lack of?) taste, as well.

25 examples of the SuperSport will be built. There are virtually limitless options for the colour of the bodywork and upholstery, and Overfinch has the ability to build in whatever custom features the buyer wants. As such, Overfinch reckons that no two examples will be the same.

Price? If you gave to ask, etc.

Leeds-based Overfinch started modifying Range Rovers not long after the model was launched in the 1970s. Its Chevrolet V8 engine swaps became legendary but, in recent years, the Range Rover has become so complex and powerful that swapping in a different motor is largely redundant. Instead, it has focused more on aesthetics and custom accessories.

The craftsmanship involved is unimpeachable. As for tastefullness? You make up your own mind.

By Graham King