Porsche’s Mission E concept isn’t breaking news, but it is still something that should maintain our interest. This is the electric vehicle that will adapt and change the most over the coming years, as it readies itself for production. That is of course, if it ever makes it that far.

We’re not saying it won’t, we’re merely suggesting that with an anticipated release of 2020, a lot is going to happen in the EV market. Will the Porsche still be cutting edge by then, or will the innovative offerings it has be commonplace to the point of being bland by 2020? It’s a big question.

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Mission E is a revolution, but will it stay that way?

The German car-maker is putting a lot on this side of the business. We’re talking about┬áplans to invest $1.1 billion dollars and recruit 1,400 people. There’s no doubt that this tech is going to be a massive part of future cars. But, will Mission E stay at the forefront for Porsche, or will it simply be genesis for the company’s investment in this tech?

The car, as it stands, is very clever. It features a charging system that can feed from plates in the road (the plug in option is there, too, of course). There is obviously a dependency on supportive infrastructure with that, but it will hopefully come in time. Plus, no other EV players have extensively developed this option. That gives Porsche the edge, but it’s the only thing that does. Everything else is pretty commonplace.

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The rear-view cameras, the heads-up display, the battery range, it’s all current tech. It’s not 2020 ‘something to look forward to’ tech. The suicide rear doors are funky, but that’s all. The 1964 Lincoln Continental did that, let alone a modern Porsche.

Yes, the Mission E has a dash that tracks your eye movement so it’s always visible. Clever, but is it also a solution to a problem that never existed? The Mission E is, after having it in the motoring consciousness for a while, is starting to glow a little bit less.

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We’re not saying it’s bad, far from it. It’s still exciting and shows commitment from Porsche to maintain its ethos of speed and luxury in the EV market. Along with clear innovation, too.

We just think that maybe it’s been on the hob a bit too long. On its own, with no threat from the rest of the market, the Mission E would be a car to keep us excited for the next four years. However, with Tesla constantly reshaping the EV landscape, the Mission E moves closer to the chronicles of concepts, rather than the road. Then there’s every other manufacturer learning, growing and, fundamentally, competing.

The Mission E was an impressive machine. Sadly though, we can’t help but think its legacy will be of it being a crucial learning curve for Porsche. Looking at what’s available to buy today, the poor Mission E could well be outdated before it’s even new.