This is the Ferrari F12tdf, a lighter, faster, harder version of the big, front-engined V12 supercar.

The F12tdf is one of the most most powerful naturally-aspirated road cars there has ever been. Ferrari’s engine engineers borrowed the mechanical tappets and variable-geometry intake trumpets from F1 race cars, boosting the 6.3-litre unit’s output to 758bhp and 520lb/ft of torque.

Peak power comes in at 8,500rpm, max torque at 6,750rpm, though 80% is available from as low as 2,500rpm. The 8,900rpm redline is stratospheric for such a big engine; we can only imagine what sort of ungodly noise it makes on the limiter.

The bodywork has been heavily revised for maximum aerodynamic effect. The front bumper incorporates a huge splitter which combines with dive planes, floor wings and louvres to improve the aero efficiency of the sides and underbody.

The front wing Aerobridge has been redesigned, boosting airflow along the top of the body sides; louvres have been added above the rear wheelarch, increasing downforce in that area of the underbody. The rear spoiler is bigger and Ferrari even went to the trouble of making the rear window more vertical, further improving airflow.

As a result, there is a total of 230kg of downforce at 124mph, 107kg more than the standard F12.

Bigger front tyres and a new rear-wheel-steering system – known as Virtual Short Wheelbase – sharpens up the F12tdf’s handling and gets the best out of the extra downforce. It laps Ferrari’s Fiorano test track in just 1min 21sec, two seconds faster than the standard F12.

Acceleration numbers are as tiny as you’d expect. 0-62mph is dispatched in 2.9secs, 0-124mph in 7.9secs. Top speed is beyond 211mph.

Equally impressive are stopping distances. Carbon ceramics discs clamped by one-piece calipers lifted from the LaFerrari haul the F12tdf to a stop from 62mph in 30.5m and from 124mph in 121m.

Extensive use of carbonfibre inside and out has stripped 110kg from the F12’s kerweight, the F12tdf tipping the scales at 1,530kg. The options list is full of yet more lightweight componentry, bringing the weight down under the 1.5t mark.

In case you’re wondering, the tdf moniker is a reference to the Tour de France Auto, one of the great motoring competitions that Ferrari won four times on the trot in the Fifties. Indeed, after the first win in ’56, the name was applied to the 250 GT Berlinetta that won. The 250 GT TdF remains one of the most collectible classic Ferraris.

Will the F12tdf achieve the same level desirability as its illustrious forebear in years to come? Probably. Only 799 built, far less than Ferrari could actually sell. The price hasn’t been announced, but the standard F12berlinetta costs £240,000.

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By Only Motors