Many carmakers claim to make the most extreme road car in existence. But Liverpool-based BAC may have got an immovable grasp on that title thanks to this, the all-new BAC Mono R.

It may not look all that much different to the original Mono, but BAC claims it is entirely new. The aerodynamics have been completely revamped, power has increased and its been on a crash diet.

Not that it was a heavyweight to begin with. Still, BAC has managed to trim 25kg off the Mono’s mass so it now tips the scales at a scant 555kg. That reduction has been achieved through the first automotive use of graphene-reinforced carbonfibre. The material is lighter, stronger and more thermally efficient than regular carbonfibre.

A heavily modified version of the Mono’s already-near-race-spec engine provides an extra 35bhp. The Ford-based, Mountune-built, 2.5 4cyl unit features a bigger cylinder bore, new throttle bodies and cylinder head and a Formula 3-style ram-air intake. It breathes through a titanium exhaust. The result is a stratospheric 8,800rpm rev limit and 340bhp.

The power-to-weight ratio is a superbike-like 612bhp-per-ton and 0-60mph takes a mere 2.5secs. Launching it from a catapult wouldn’t be much quicker. Top speed? 170mph.

Incidentally, the bhp-per-litre figure of 136bhp is a world record for a road-legal production car.

Aerodynamics have been honed with new front wheelarches, wider sidepods and rear spoiler. The frontal area has been reduced and the upper body is slimmed down as well, helping the Mono R cut through the air more efficiently.

No less than 44 body parts have been redesigned. New LED lighting and a revised rear crash box are added, too.

AP Racing brake calipers, adjustable Ohlins dampers and Pirelli Trofeo R tyres tighten the driving experience. Not that it needed to be.

As we said, this could well be the most extreme road car ever. It’s also the most self-indulgent car ever, being a single-seater.

Just 30 will be built and its already sold out, despite the massive £190,950 price tag.

It’s very much a toy, but what a toy.

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By Graham King