Paris has revealed plans to ban the most polluting vehicles from the city centre. The restrictions will start this summer, when all coaches,buses and lorries registered before 30 September 2001 will be banned from central Paris.

Parisian mayor Anne Hidalgo has introduced the rules in an effort to combat air pollution, especially particulate emissions generated by diesels and older petrol-powered vehicles.

Cars registered before 31 December 1996 and vans and light trucks registered before 30 September 1997 will also be banned from this summer. It’s understood that restricted vehicles will still be able to use the Peripherique motorway that circles Paris.

According to reports by French media, the restrictions will affect more recent cars through the rest of the this decade. By 2020, only private cars registered after 2011 and post-July 2015 motorcycles will be allowed into the centre of Paris. Restrictions on commercial vehicles and taxis will be similarly tightened.

The French government is expected to offer subsidies for drivers to buy newer, cleaner cars, particularly if other French cities follow suit. Estimates as high as three million have been put on the number of cars likely to be scrapped as a result.

Other cities across Europe, including London, are looking to introduce their own restrictions on older vehicles, in response to EU air quality rules. After more than a decade focusing on carbon dioxide emissions and their contribution to global warming, regulators have caught up to the impact of localised particulate emissions and the health problems they cause.